Sep 18, 2014

Meet the Rockling Cardigan from Graphic Knits

Rockling was the second pattern I wrote for my book, Graphic Knits.

Like my Minnow Top, this is another example of a stitch pattern inspiring a garment. I actually knitted a cardigan similar to this many years ago before I began recording my patterns. I loved that sweater so much and practically wore it out. When I ran across this beautiful slipped-stitch textured pattern in one of Barbara Walker's Treasuries I knew it would be perfect for this wonderful cozy cardigan. Here's the sketch that I included in my book proposal:

I was really excited to get started on this one. I remember casting on while sitting outside in the Brooklyn Bridge Park almost exactly 2 years ago. The giant yarn cake of the freshly wound Eco+ Wool seemed like a ridiculous thing to lug around on my bike, but I love knitting outdoors!

I finished the cardigan in just a few weeks and proudly wore the sample to work the next day. My husband snapped a few pictures of me before I walked out the door in my new sweater.

I look pretty proud of myself, don't I?! I was definitely feeling good that day. Putting my second book design to bed gave me a little more confidence, for that day, at least!

I like the finished version even more than my original design sketch. I love to look back at my old sketches and compare them to the finished garments. I get a little sentimental because every change occurred for a reason, and I'm reminded of a particular challenge or insight I had along the way.

I loved this design so much, that I just couldn't wait for the sample to come back from Interweave. After I turned in my manuscript I scooped up some yarn from L & B Yarn Co and knitted another one to keep in my cubicle at work. I rarely reknit my own designs, so it was a little weird for me to experience the pattern as a reader would. Actually, it was much more relaxing without all the second-guessing of myself that usually occurs in my design process!

For more information about the design, check out the pattern page here.

Comments

  • D41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e.png?s=100&d=https%3a%2f%2fknitdarling.s3.amazonaws.com%2fassets%2fsheep avatars%2fsheepsies5

    Helen
    almost 8 years ago

    I bought the book for the Rockling Cardigan. Gorgeous.

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    Vicki Henderson
    over 4 years ago

    I am knitting this for my daughter. I love the pattern but am having problems on the shall collar. I have done the short rows and knit around for the increased stitches. I am confused at how to “maintain 2x2 ribbing between the markers” as it says in the pattern. If I increase on either side of a section between the markers how can it remain 2x2 knitting without the stitches getting off sync? Please help. Thanks.

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    Alexis Winslow
    over 4 years ago

    Hi Vicki- Try to think of the stitches between each of the markers as their own distinct sections. You must maintain the ribbing pattern in each of the sections independently. The sections at the beginning and end are easy because you aren't increasing there at all. You are only increasing at the edges of the center section. Every time you add a stitch to the beginning of this section, the starting point of your 2x2 ribbing pattern will need to be adjusted to match the rest of the section. The pattern will appear 'out of sync' at first, but after you have finished all the increase rows you will see that you have added enough stitches to make the rib patterns in all sections align perfectly.

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